Question: Can You Or Can I Grammar?

Can I come in or may I come in?

“Can” is about ability while “may” is about permission, so “can you come” (are you able to come) and “may I come” (do I have permission to come) are the right forms there.

When asking someone else to meet/join you, you may also see “will you” (are you agreeable to this)..

Can I use the future?

The use of ‘could’, ‘would’, or ‘will be’ all imply future tense. The past tense version would be: “You could not have made me happy, and I am convinced that I am the last woman in the world who could have made you so.”

Can or could you please?

“Could” is the polite form of “can”—so both are correct, but we use them in different situations. We use “can” when we are telling someone to do something. We use “could” when we are making a request. Teacher to students: “Can you please be quiet!”

Can you or will you?

May implies that you are asking for permission. Can implies that you are questioning somebody’s ability. Will implies that you are seeking an answer about the future.

How do you ask for help in English?

Asking for helpCan you give me a hand with this?Could you help me for a second?Can I ask a favour?I wonder if you could help me with this?I could do with some help, please.I can’t manage. Can you help?Give me a hand with this, will you?Lend me a hand with this, will you?More items…

Could you vs Can you grammar?

To summarize, ‘can’ is the present tense version of the word and ‘could’ is the past tense version of the word. … When asking someone to do something, either word can be used, but ‘could’ is considered to be more polite.

Can we use or could we use?

When could is used as the past tense of can, it refers to an ability that a person generally had in the past or to something that was generally possible in the past (“When I was younger, I could run for miles,” or “It used to be you could buy lunch for a dollar.”).

Can I ask you or may I ask you?

May I ask you a question? Asking for permission. In addition, “may” version is more polite than the “can” version. Realistically speaking, both ask for permission and neither is offensive, but yes, “may” is still more polite than “can.”

Can I ask you something if you don’t mind?

used in order to be more polite when you say something that could slightly upset, annoy, or embarrass someone: If you don’t mind me saying (so), I think the soup needs a little more salt. Do you have a boyfriend, if you don’t mind me asking?

Can May will Grammar?

May is a preferred in a formal style or when you want to be more polite. In less formal situations, can is perfectly acceptable. Both can and may are used to ask for permission.

When to say may I?

“May I” should be used when you are seeking someone’s permission. When you say ‘may I’, you are asking permission. When you say ‘can I’ you are asking if it is possible for you to complete a task. It is simply grammatically and definitively more correct to ask permission to do something.

Can I or may I Which is correct?

May is the more formal word, and if you are at all concerned about being tut-tutted, a safe choice. Can is now the verb of choice for ability, and both can and may are still used in the “possibility” sense. You may use can if you wish, and you can use may if it makes you feel better.

Can I use grammar?

Can is an auxiliary verb, a modal auxiliary verb. We use can to: talk about possibility and ability. make requests….We use can to talk about what is possible, what we are able or free to do:She can drive a car.John can speak Spanish.I cannot hear you. (I can’t hear you.)Can you hear me?

Can and could sentences examples?

We use could to show that something is possible, but not certain:They could come by car. (= Maybe they will come by car.) … It can be very cold here in winter. … That can’t be true. … It’s ten o’clock. … It could be very cold there in winter. … They know the way here. … She can speak several languages. … I can see you.More items…

How do you reply can I ask you something?

What’s the most polite way to answer “can I ask you a question?” If you’re willing to hear them out, then “Yes, you may” is polite, formal and grammatically correct. You are not obligated to answer their question if you don’t want to.